ScienceDaily baby-related scientific news

Pregnancy and Childbirth

Breastfeeding

Infant’s Health

Child Psychology

  • Depressive symptoms are more common in teenage girls than in their male peers. However, boys' mental health appears to be affected more if they suffer from obesity. Irrespective of gender, bullying is a considerably greater risk factor than overweight for developing depressive symptoms.
  • People who feel younger have a greater sense of well-being, better cognitive functioning, less inflammation, lower risk of hospitalization and even live longer than their older-feeling peers. A study suggests one potential reason for the link between subjective age and health: Feeling younger could help buffer middle-aged and older adults against the damaging effects of […]
  • New research suggests that students learning remotely become night owls but do not sleep more despite the time saved commuting, working or attending social events.
  • Young people need additional support and protection in the criminal justice system because they are more susceptible to pleading guilty when innocent, a new study argues.
  • Although the fairy tale of the wicked stepmother is a tale as old as time, the effects of blending children with their new stepfamilies may not be as grim as once thought. In fact, new research shows that stepchildren are not at a disadvantage compared to their peers from single-parent households and actually experience better […]

Parenting

Child Development

  • In order to find our way in the world, we classify it into concepts, such as 'telephone'. Until now, it was unclear how the brain retrieves these when we only encounter the word and don't perceive the objects directly. Scientists have now developed a model of how the brain processes abstract knowledge. They found that […]
  • New research suggests that students learning remotely become night owls but do not sleep more despite the time saved commuting, working or attending social events.
  • Although the fairy tale of the wicked stepmother is a tale as old as time, the effects of blending children with their new stepfamilies may not be as grim as once thought. In fact, new research shows that stepchildren are not at a disadvantage compared to their peers from single-parent households and actually experience better […]
  • A premature start in life can cause problems even into teenage years. A study indicates that training motor skills in these children helps even when they are older.
  • Children born in December are almost twice as likely to be diagnosed with a learning disorder as those born in January in school districts with a December 31 cut-off date. ADHD was found not to affect the association between month of birth and the likelihood of a learning disability diagnosis.

Infant and Preschool Learning

  • Researchers have created a new, open-access tool that allows doctors and scientists to evaluate infant brain health by assessing the concentration of various chemical markers, called metabolites, in the brain. The tool compiled data from 140 infants to determine normal ranges for these metabolites.
  • In some men, having traditional masculine characteristics such as competitiveness and adventurousness was linked to being better fathers to infants, a new study found. But the men in this study – highly educated and from dual-earner couples – combined those stereotypically masculine traits with the belief that they should be nurturing, highly involved fathers.
  • While it isn't surprising that infants and children love to look at people's movements and faces, recent research studies exactly where they look when they see someone using sign language. The research uses eye-tracking technology that offers a non-invasive and powerful tool to study cognition and language learning in pre-verbal infants.
  • Exposure to phthalates, a class of chemicals widely used in packaging and consumer products, is known to interfere with normal hormone function and development. Now researchers have found evidence linking pregnant women's exposure to phthalates to altered cognitive outcomes in their infants.
  • Babies can recognise combinations of words even before they have uttered their first word, a study suggests, challenging ideas of how children learn language. Assessments in 11-12 month-olds show that infants at the cusp of talking are already processing multiword phrases such as 'clap your hands'.